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Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education

Following on the success of his TED talk, How Schools Kill Creativity, Sir Ken Robinson has written this book to stimulate change from within (and outside) of the system of education. As he states in the introduction, “If you’re involved in education in any way you have three options: you can make changes within the system, you can press for changes to the system, or you can take initiatives outside the system. A lot of the examples in this book are of innovations within the system as it is. Systems as a whole are capable of changing too, and in many ways they already are. The more innovation there is within them, the more likely they are to evolve as a whole.” It’s “The Book I’m Reading” rather than “The Book I Read” and I’m not far enough into it to provide a review as it was just recently released this month but I look forward to perhaps discussing it at the iiE Gathering.

28 thoughts on “Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education”

  1. This is the book that I am reading. It has a lot of insight as to how schools might foster children away from creativity. So far, it has been very interesting and I am excited to see how it develops.

  2. First of all, this was an excellent read. The whole time it felt more like a conversation than a book. I often found myself going to argue a point with Ken Robinson, and the next paragraph or two would answer what my question. I don’t feel like he stayed away from the complexity of the issue, which I appreciate.

    I also enjoyed the comparisons and analogies he drew throughout the book, for example, comparing educational models to industrial and organic farming. I liked that he focused both on the research and best practices that have measurable results, but also had a chapter on the art of teaching.

    I think the book is a great place to start a conversation. It doesn’t dive deep into one particular area, but it is a good overview of some of the changes that have been made to education over the years in the United States. The book compares those changes to unique educational situations that are happening, and those that could happen. It also includes lots of interesting information about the roots of testing and standards based education. I’m excited to discuss the book at the conference.

  3. one particular area, but it is a good overview of some of the changes that have been made to education over the years in the United States. The book compares those changes to unique educational situations that are happening, and those that could happen. It also includes lots of interesting information about the roots of testing and standard

  4. obinson has written this book to stimulate change from within (and outside) of the system of education. As he states in the introduction, “If you’re involved in education in any way you have three options: you can make changes within the system, you can press for changes to the system, or you can take initiatives outside the system. A lot of the examples in this

  5. and the older nurturing the younger. At one point, the younger self tries to show the older self the way out, but it’s pointless, because the older self has allowed society, life, and even himself to crush his own spirit and creativity, keeping him prisoner in his own cage.

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